Southern Brew News February/March 2014 : Page 1

Feb/Mar 2014 Vol.9 No.1 For the Love of Fans camp out overnight at Foothill Brewing for the release of "Sexual Chocolate Imperial Stout". PHOTO COURTESY OF RAY GOODRICH AND FOOTHILLS BREWERY By Steve Deason t is two o’clock in the morning as the crowd leaves Foothills Brewpub in Winston-Salem, North Carolina and heads out-side to wait. At eight a.m. the brewery will open again to allow the crowd to warm up. The first sale of the coveted Foothill’s Sexual Chocolate Imperial Stout is at ten. This ritual has occurred yearly since Sexual Chocolate was introduced in 2007 as a Valentine’s Day seasonal. Foothill Brewing Company Brew Master Jamie Bartholaus says this year’s release will be February 1. The gates will open on March 8 at Cigar City Brewing in Tampa, Florida, as it once again celebrates Hanuhpa’s Day. This brewery exclusive release party for See Chocolate p. 4 NOT SO SILENT BOB. A vocal proponent for improving Georgia's beer laws, Wrecking Bar's Bob Sandage hosted last December's Strong Beer Fest for the Georgia Craft Brewers Guild. PHOTO BY ALE SHARPTON INSIDE State by State News Calendar ...................................... 2 Tasting Notes ................................ 6 Dr. Brewski .................................. 7 Homebrew News ............................ 8 The Style Section .......................... 10 Map & Directories .....................12-15 Louisiana .......................................... 11 Georgia ............................................ 16 Tennessee ......................................... 18 Alabama/Mississippi .......................... 19 The Carolinas ................................... 20 Florida ............................................. 22 N By John Pinkerton umerous businesses and indus-tries have trade organizations that endeavor to promote and protect the interests of it members. Perhaps it's a benchmark of the craft brewing industry's progress that 49 of the United States now have a guild representing its small brew-ers. Considering that Georgia has some of the most restrictive alcohol laws and highest excise taxes in the entire U.S., Georgia craft brewers have good reason to stand together as the Georgia Craft Brewers Guild. Rome wasn't built in day, though. Crawford Moran, brewmaster of Five Seasons recalls, "We have tried to get the See Guild p. 3

For The Love Of Chocolate

Steve Deason

It is two o’clock in the morning as the crowd leaves Foothills Brewpub in Winston-Salem, North Carolina and heads outside to wait. At eight a.m. the brewery will open again to allow the crowd to warm up. The first sale of the coveted Foothill’s Sexual Chocolate Imperial Stout is at ten.This ritual has occurred yearly since Sexual Chocolate was introduced in 2007 as a Valentine’s Day seasonal. Foothill Brewing Company Brew Master Jamie Bartholaus says this year’s release will be February 1.

The gates will open on March 8 at Cigar City Brewing in Tampa, Florida, as it once again celebrates Hanuhpa’s Day.This brewery exclusive release party for Hunahpu’s Imperial Stout made with cacao, chilies, vanilla, and cinnamon attracted 9,000 people last year. This year the release event has been turned into a festival limited to 3500 people at $50 each. In August of 2013 Cigar City teamed up with Mikkeller from Copenhagen, Denmark to create Life is Like, an Imperial Sweet Stout brewed with cocao nibs, cherries, and aged in bourbon barrels.Life is Like is named after a line in the movie Forest Gump. Some of the remaining stock, priced at $25 a bottle, may be held back for Valentine’s Day release.

Terrapin Beer Company experienced a social media and buying frenzy with a special release last fall of White Chocolate Moo-Hoo, based on their popular seasonal Moo-Hoo Chocolate Milk Stout”. Terrapin Brew Master and Co-Founder Brian “Spike” Buckowski says he has never seen anything like this with any of their beers. Terrapin brewed eight hundred barrels of Moo-Hoo and eighty barrels of White Chocolate Moo-Hoo. In 2012 Terrapin fans voted Dos Cocoas chocolate porter as the beer they most wanted brought out of retirement. Dos Cocoas was created in 2008 as a side project.The brewers at these three southern breweries know is there is something special about the combination of chocolate and beer. Drinking beer and eating chocolate together is so popular there are festivals that focus on the combo. Craft brewers and artisan chocolate makers often hold tastings together, many near Valentine’s Day. Like pairing wine and cheese, there is considerable skill in becoming an expert on pairing the right beer with the right chocolate. Adding chocolate to beer requires a considerable skill set, too. One that southern brewers are having a lot of fun mastering.

The relationship between beer and chocolate started at the beginning of cocoa consumption. Central American Indians made beer out of cocao seedpods around 1100 B.C. About 300 years later people in the area started making a non-alcoholic drink out of the almond shaped cocao seeds according to a study co-authored by Cornell University Anthropologist John Henderson and University of California Anthropologist Rosemary Joyce as reported by National Geographic News in 2007. This report shows that humans have been consuming the cocoa nut about five hundreds longer than previously thought and as a direct result of beer making activities. Cocao is the raw nut from The cocao tree and cocoa is the nut material after processing.

Wayne Wambles, Brew Master at Cigar City Brewing researched the Mayan’s use of chocolate before releasing Hunahpu’s Imperial Stout. The stout is named after the Sun God of Mayan Mythology. He and his twin brother (Moon God Xbalanque) were created after their father was killed and his body morphed into a cocao tree. Mayans believed chocolate was a gift from the gods. Wambles learned that Mayans drank a cocao drink with chilies that was not sweet.He found it interesting that drinking cocoa wasn’t well received in Europe until the addition of sugar. This sweetened cocao beverage lead to the creation of what most people think of as chocolate today.

Highland Brewery’s Mocha Stout and River Dog Brewery’s flagship Chocolate Rye Porter have something in common.Their names may make the uninformed think there is chocolate in the beer but there is not.Brewers long ago learned that by toasting grain in various ways they could alter the flavor of the beer. Both these brewers are very clear in their descriptions that the chocolate flavors in these beers are the result of a blend of specially roasted malts. The menu of grains and how they are toasted helps set The style of the beer. As an example Wambles says “when I think of Porter, I think of chocolate.Lots and lots of chocolate”.

Brew Master Dan Baker of River Dog Brewery located in the South Carolina Low Country says the Chocolate Rye Porter is brewed using Weyerman® Chocolate Rye.Baker joined River Dog in the late summer of 2013. Shortly after starting he was asked by a customer trying their Chocolate Rye Porter, “How do you get the chocolate in it?” Baker “told him no chocolate in it, that it came from the kilning of the malt”. The customer was very skeptical as he is allergic to chocolate.Baker reassured him by showing him the grains and explaining the process.

Making beer with ingredients from the cocao tree can be tricky, especially on a large scale. Baker brewed Toffee Holiday Ale from chocolate covered toffees purchased from River Street Sweets in Savanah.The goal was to produce a lighter holiday beer you could enjoy after a big holiday meal. Although he was pleased with the outcome, he ended up with a giant ball of toffees in the tank and not much chocolate flavor.

Most breweries use cocao nibs when making a beer with chocolate ingredients. “Cocao shells offer a nuttier profile (compared to the cocao nut or nibs) but are hard to work with because they are light and fluffy” according to Buckowski. Terrapin used cocoa shells in their Dos Cocoas, Reunion Ale, and Moo- Hoo originally. They no longer use the shells in Moo-Hoo based on “sensory evaluation sessions”.

Wambles said when using cocao at Cigar City he is “careful to have a heavy malt balance as chocolate can be quite forward, become dry and astringent tasting”. Bartholaus, Wambles, and Buckowski shared that they add their nibs “on the cold side” of the brewing process either in the fermenter or conditioning stages. Buckowski explained that he doesn’t do additives on the “hot side” as the outcome can be bitter, like burnt coffee.The only exception at Terrapin is when they brew with pumpkin spices.

White Chocolate is made from the cocoa butter of the cocao nut. This created a challenge when Buckowski was creating the White Chocolate Moo- Hoo at Terrapin.They clearly weren’t going to brew with butter he said. Buckowski worked with Scott Witerow, founder and owner of Olive and Sinclair Chocolate Company to get the White Chocolate profile without using cocoa butter.Terrapin sources all of their cocao products from Olive and Sinclair, maker of fine Southern Artisan Chocolates from Nashville, Tennessee. Like many of our southern craft brewers, they strive to work with local suppliers.As to the final recipe for the “white” version of Moo- Hoo, Buckowski says it adds vanilla and “magic dust” and that is all he will admit “on the record”.

Jason Fromm, who is is in charge of research and development at Cigar City, disclosed that Cigar City uses “primarily three kinds of cocoa nibs Ivory Coast, Peruvian, & Papa New Guinea. The Ivory has a good rich chocolate flavor and was used in Chocolate Cherry Almond, Chocolate Peanut Butter Brown and the odd but popular Chocolate Peanut Butter IPA that we made for our Jaialaiween event. The Peruvian is richer and goes well with coffee and spices. It is also used in our Hunahpu’s Imperial Stout. The Papa New Guinea is more bitter and used in the Chocolate Raspberry Lager to match the tartness of the raspberries.We use this with other bitter or tart flavors as well.”

Bartholmaus says Foothills uses Peruvian cocao nibs in the second fermentation stage for three to four weeks. He has tried nibs from other countries but found that like his coffee, Peruvian is his favorite. Bartholmaus talked of how chocolate is a fruit and when used raw adds complexity and the brightness of fruit. Sexual Chocolate is an Imperial Stout created shortly after North Carolina lifted their alcohol content limits.Bartholmaus says that he could produce five batches of IPA in the time it takes to produce Sexual Chocolate but that it’s worth it to provide something special. Foothills also produce a barrel stout version of Sexual Chocolate.The barrels add vanilla and coconut flavors, Bartholmaus says.

United States consumption of chocolate is over eleven pounds per year per person.The top consuming countries eat over twice as much. Americans buy over fifty-eight millions pounds of chocolate during Valentine’s week each year. So what makes chocolate so popular? Chocolate contains a small amount of caffeine. Cocoa beans contain from .2% to .7% caffeine compared to 1.2% average for regular coffee beans according to Amano Artisan Chocolate Company. Chocolate has a reputation as an aphrodisiac. Aztec Emperor Montezuma and famed lover Casanova were both big believers. Science has shown that chocolate causes our bodies to release endorphins and serotonin which make us feel good.Phenyl ethylamine a stimulant or “mood elevator” compound is also found in chocolate.This same chemical is released in our bodies when we fall in love.

Orlando Brewing released the first beer of their “Babe’s Brew” series in December 2013. Operations Manager Megan Cheek wanted to get the women, mostly in the office area, involved in the beer making process.These seven women’s first brew was Chocolate Mint Girl Stout. Why chocolate? Cheek simply said “girls love chocolate”. So maybe the Mayan’s had it right that chocolate was a gift from the gods. The Roman love god Cupid is on many of those heart shaped boxes of chocolates for Valentine’s Day. So if someone asks why you lined up overnight for a chocolate beer, just tell them you did it for love.

Read the full article at http://mydigitalpublication.com/article/For+The+Love+Of+Chocolate/1630327/196098/article.html.

Fights For Change

John Pinkerton

NOT SO SILENT BOB. A vocal proponent for improving Georgia's beer laws, Wrecking Bar's Bob Sandage hosted last December's Strong Beer Fest for the Georgia Craft Brewers Guild.

Numerous businesses and industries have trade organizations that endeavor to promote and protect the interests of it members. Perhaps it's a benchmark of the craft brewing industry's progress that 49 of the United States now have a guild representing its small brewers.Considering that Georgia has some of the most restrictive alcohol laws and highest excise taxes in the entire U.S., Georgia craft brewers have good reason to stand together as the Georgia Craft Brewers Guild.

Rome wasn't built in day, though.Crawford Moran, brewmaster of Five Seasons recalls, "We have tried to get the Guild going since 1996." Originally formed as the Atlanta Brewers Guild, it later expanded into the Southeastern Brewers Guild as brewers from Alabama and Tennessee joined."Back then we only talked about technical matters and spent a lot of time touring the breweries," says Max Lager's brewmaster and partner John Roberts.

I have my own foggy memories of a few of these early meetings where brewer shop talk and beer drinking decidedly outweighed matters of business. Those were difficult years for more than a few Georgia brewers and many on that early roster are not around anymore. Ultimately everyone was too busy struggling to survive and the activities of the Guild waned.

Fast forward 13 years to early 2009, when the Georgia brewing community was experiencing a renewed sense of purpose with an ill-fated attempt to legalize growlers.Later that spring, after numerous phone calls and meetings, it was time for “putting the band back together” and we spent the rest of 2009 hashing out the tedious details of Guild policy and drafting our bylaws. Finally, in the first few days of 2010 we adopted those bylaws and held our first Board of Directors election. We were officially up and running.

The GCBG got right to work with a string of legislative initiatives that finally bore fruit at the end of the 2012 General Assembly with the passage of HB472, increasing the barrelage cap for Brewpubs.Since then, our primary focus has been the development and support for HB 314/ SB 174, seeking to allow breweries and brewpubs to engage in limited retail for off premise consumption (288 oz. Per person, per day).

This fall, we attended a number of Study Committee Hearings to provide testimony to support these Bills. Repeatedly we've been told that the current system works quite well and doesn't need to be fixed. The question is: For whom does the system work well? We genuinely value a system that fosters vigorous and healthy interbrand competition. But, based on our research, it appears Georgia's current Code reaches beyond it's Constitutional rights. Is it fair to limit how Georgia brewers can sell their beer while our unfettered craft brewing friends from California, Colorado and Michigan cheerfully supplied roughly 70% of the craft beer consumed in Georgia?

Alcohol issues are invariably complicated and the other players involved have much more money and influence than our organization.However, we know that our time will come. When you hear politicians talk about Main Street America, they are talking about Georgia's small and independent breweries.With Georgia's legislature slap full of free market Republicans and tea-partiers, one can only hope that they can work Georgia craft brewers into all that talk about supporting the growth of small businesses and getting the government out of the way of our business.

The stories from craft brewers all across this country are so compelling that New York Governor Andrew Cuomo recently pledged up to $3 million to his state's Beer, Wine and Spirits manufacturers. The state of North Carolina was so compelled by stories about the economic and employment potential of craft brewers they pledged north of $10 million to lure two of the biggest craft brewers in the country, Sierra Nevada and New Belgium, to build additional breweries there. We've never asked Governor Deal for a penny, but I'd love to know if he found some of these stories compelling too.

In spite of our regulatory hardships, Georgia is an amazing craft beer market and consumers are fired up. Georgia craft beer fans are active constituents who will be engaging their Georgia Representatives and Senators like never before. The onslaught of phone calls, letters and emails asking for their legislator's support of HB314/ SB174 will be unprecedented. It should be a memorable session.

To be certain, we're up against powerful forces. But, we're are in it for the long haul.Spoiler alert: the 2014 General Assembly will not be our final engagement. I wouldn't dare predict the outcome for HB314/ SB174, but I can promise everyone that we will be back every year for the foreseeable future seeking substantial reforms to Georgia's alcohol related Code.

Of course, there's more to the Guild than government affairs work. We are also working very hard to work to find new ways to promote Georgia's craft brewers and craft beer culture. The Wrecking Bar Brewpub in Atlanta recently held their first annual Strong Beer Festival which exclusively featured Georgia craft beer and we are already hearing from other members who want to put on similar events. Red Brick Brewing Company has offered to allow the GCBG to use their facility as the venue for the first official GCBG Beer Fest on March 22. The tickets for that event will provide a strong incentive to join the Guild as an Enthusiast Member, so please stay tuned for details as that develops.

We are also very excited to be organizing the first annual GCBG Craft Brewers Symposium to be held at the Courtyard Marriot Downtown Decatur on April 19 from 9am to 5pm. Nancy Palmer, the Guild's VP of Development says, "We'll have seminars running throughout the day on both the science and business of brewing, geared toward both the professional and soon to be professional brewing crowd." More Details will soon be available on the GCBG website.

Additionally, we are developing a beer trail website and corresponding print material, similar to what is commonly seen promoting wine tourism in various states. Wild Heaven Craft Beers'Brewmaster, Eric Johnson, is leading this project and offers, "Our proposed launch date is spring 2014 and we want a site that allows users to find the relevant info that they need to experience Georgia beer in a way that has not been aggregated before."

Still waiting for the other shoe to drop on this rubber boot business? If you've ever seen brewers at work, you've probably Noticed that brewing is a pretty wet process.We wear rubber boots to protect our feet, but the boot is more than a literal depiction, it symbol of our trade: we are workers, artisans, proud makers.

John Pinkerton is the Co-owner and Brewmaster of the Moon River Brewing Company in Savannah, Georgia and the President of the Georgia Craft Brewers Guild.

Read the full article at http://mydigitalpublication.com/article/Fights+For+Change/1630331/196098/article.html.

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