Southern Brew News August/September 2013 : Page 1

Questioning Our Craft Beer Culture By Owen Ogletree By Tony Kiss t's been a very busy summer for beer in and around Asheville with the opening of four new breweries and a fifth still to arrive. Meanwhile, there's been a construction delay y at New Belgium Brewing project roject in Asheville's River Arts District. For the past few months, New Belgium had been preparing the site for its $175 million East Coast expansion brewery. In May, New Belgium man-agement announced it was delaying the I B ILLUSTRATION BY: HANS GRANHEIM obby Beer-Lover packs his bags in preparation for a 800 mile drive to the exclusive nanobrewery release of a new ultra-rare, highly an-ticipated, 18% alcohol-by-volume (ABV), barrel-aged seasonal ale. He'll arrive at the brewery at 6:00 a.m., set up his lawn chair in the parking lot and chat up a hundred or so other beer pilgrims from several states who also made the journey. Later that day, his buddies back home gather at their local pub to drink the pale ale and IPA from the brewery down the street and raise a toast to wish Bobby a happy and fruitful journey. Just fifteen or so years ago, the scenario outlined above would never have taken place. My, how craft beer culture has evolved. The current, explosive craft beer craze in the United States can be described as exciting, trendy, cutting-edge, fanatical, obsessive and creative. Many say it's "craft beer nirvana," while others wonder whether or not it's a bit out of control. This article poses four questions concerning our modern craft beer climate... Just because a beer is very rare, does that make it great? Bobby Beer-Lover would offer an em-phatic "yes." Small-batch and hard-to-find brews make up an exciting aspect of craft beer collecting and tasting, and seeking out these beers and traveling to "release days" can be extremely enjoyable for many beer geeks. Also, many modern beer aficionados will only attend festivals or beer dinners that offer special beers not readily available in See Questioning p. 3 construction, due to con c adding increased ad capacity at its origi-ca nal n brewery in Fort Collins, Colorado. C The Asheville brewery, which br would eventu-wo ally a employ about 150 workers, worke has been pushed back by about abou eight months, a company spokesman said. As the sched-ule now stands, it would open in late 2015 or early 2016. Hi-Wire Brewing has opened on Hilliard Avenue in what has become See Asheville p. 5 Calendar ...................................... 2 Dr. Brewski .................................. 6 Tasting Notes ................................ 6 Homebrew News ............................ 8 The Style Section ........................... 8 Waynesville Beer Scene ................ 9 Map & Directories .....................12-15 Louisiana .......................................... 11 Georgia ............................................ 16 Alabama/Mississippi .......................... 18 Tennessee ......................................... 19 The Carolinas ................................... 20 Florida ............................................. 22

Questioning Our Craft Beer Culture

Owen Ogletree

Bobby Beer-Lover packs his bags in preparation for a 800 mile drive to the exclusive nanobrewery release of a new ultra-rare, highly anticipated, 18% alcohol-by-volume (ABV), barrel-aged seasonal ale. He'll arrive at the brewery at 6:00 a. m., set up his lawn chair in the parking lot and chat up a hundred or so other beer pilgrims from several states who also made the journey. Later that day, his buddies back home gather at their local pub to drink the pale ale and IPA from the brewery down the street and raise a toast to wish Bobby a happy and fruitful journey.

Just fifteen or so years ago, the scenario outlined above would never have taken place. My, how craft beer culture has evolved. The current, explosive craft beer craze in the United States can be described as exciting, trendy, cutting-edge, fanatical, obsessive and creative. Many say it's "craft beer nirvana," while others wonder whether or not it's a bit out of control. This article poses four questions concerning our modern craft beer climate...

Just because a beer is very rare, does that make it great?

Bobby Beer-Lover would offer an emphatic "yes." Small-batch and hard-to-find brews make up an exciting aspect of craft beer collecting and tasting, and seeking out these beers and traveling to "release days" can be extremely enjoyable for many beer geeks. Also, many modern beer aficionados will only attend festivals or beer dinners that offer special beers not readily available in local markets. It's all about the mystique of the latest, limited release beer and the thrill of the hunt.

Others disagree by saying that it's better to drink locally and support regional beers that are more affordable and often taste just as good or better than the uncommon brands offered up on special release events in other states. With so many new breweries opening up in the Southeast and across the country, many beer drinkers now find it a daunting challenge to try every new craft brand coming into local markets, and a majority of drinkers don't see a need for driving across five states to seek out a newfangled, expensive, limited release.

Are "extreme" beers the best in the world?

Loads of craft beer followers seek out radical pints that push the proverbial envelope toward palate bruising heights. These immoderate brews include barrel-aged strong ales that taste more like bourbon than beer; imperial IPAs with hops enough to seemingly strip the enamel off teeth; potent, malty imperial stouts packing a concentrated coffee punch; and beers with outlandish, spirit-like alcohol contents produced by mutant yeast strains. The U.K. even produces an ultra-expensive, collectible strong ale in a bottle swathed with a squirrel skin.

Many states in the Southeast fought long and hard for sales of high-gravity beers, and extreme beer followers there adhere to the stance that stronger, more intense beers sport passionate aromas, concentrated flavors and maximum drinking pleasure never matched by more conventional, lighterweight styles.

Conversely, more traditional styles of craft beer, especially trendy new "session" ales under 5% ABV, offer elegant, subtle nose and palate nuances that can be enjoyed pint after pint in sociable settings. Why settle for twelve ounces of a pricey, ultimate ale when, for the same price, one can quaff four pints of a lower alcohol, lower calorie, perfectly dry-hopped pale ale or new English-style mild at the local brewpub? Many traditional beer styles offer a great deal of character, along with lower gravities and respectable water contents that help avoid alcohol-related regrets the next morning. Many people want their craft beer to be delicious - yet approachable - and simply taste like malt and hops - not whisky, coffee, rum or spices.

Are there too many beer festivals these days?

Fifteen years ago, beer festivals in the Southeast seemed as hard to find as a high gravity ale wrapped in a squirrel skin. Now days, there seem to be several each weekend. Bobby Beer-Lover takes great joy in picking which events offer the widest range of rare and interesting ales and lagers, and almost every local region now boasts its own beer fest. Folks no longer need to drive long distances to enjoy the camaraderie and delightful beers offered by these celebrations that range in size from small and intimate to huge gatherings of thousands. Almost every local group or charity seems to hold the notion that running a beer festival would be fun and profitable.

On the down side, with all the new beer festivals on the scene, organizers of long-established events are now finding it more difficult to sell all their tickets, and festival budgets of breweries and distributors are stretched extremely thin. No craft beer follower could possibly have the time or resources to attend the majority of the nearby festivals, and some former beer festival enthusiasts now admit to being burned-out on the entire festival scene. Motivated by profit instead of an interest in craft beer, a few upstart festivals serve mostly mainstream products in settings more focused on consumption rather than appreciation. Hopefully, the more personable, superlative festivals will survive the current overabundance and carry on for years to come.

Are American brewers making great cask ales?

Cask ale (a.k.a. real ale) is any unfiltered, unpasteurized beer containing viable yeast cells and a bit of residual sugar that is placed in a barrel or cask to allow secondary fermentation to produce a soft carbon dioxide sparkle, unique flavor components and an eventual layer of sediment on the bottom of the container.

Cask ales make up a wonderful U.K. tradition, with the majority in that country containing only long-established, lower-gravity beers that involve no special ingredients, flavorings or processes. Across the pond, many American craft brewers take joy in adding wood chips, spices, fruit, sugars and all manner of eclectic items into the cask with the beer. Not usually limited to lower gravity brews, U.S. casks also frequently contain imperial stouts, barleywines, strong Belgian-style ales, etc.

Even though cask ale is a process, not a style of beer, some cask ale purists balk at the unusual spin of some American real ales, saying that the cask-conditioning process offers its own subtle layers of complexity that can be lost in aggressive, high gravity ales and casks dosed with spices or flavorings.

Avant-garde U.S. craft brewers argue that there's nothing wrong with adding a bit of flare to their casks — it's simply a way of making cask-conditioning their own and paying homage to this marvelous, English way of enjoying beer. It doesn't matter if the cask contains a Yorkshire best bitter or an imperial stout with ginger and vanilla beans.

The Evolving American Craft Beer Scene

Hopefully the presentation of these four questions provided fuel for thought, conversation and introspection regarding values and notions of what's important in regard to the dynamic world of craft beer in our country. We'd love to get input and reactions, so please send any brief comments, along with first name, city and state, to owen.ogletree@brewingnews.com.

Read the full article at http://sbnonline.brewingnews.com/article/Questioning+Our+Craft+Beer+Culture/1477448/170855/article.html.

Greetings From Asheville Big And Small

Tony Kiss

Asheville's craft brewing scene continues to explode

It's been a very busy summer for beer in and around Asheville with the opening of four new breweries and a fifth still to arrive.

Meanwhile, there's been a construction delay at New Belgium Brewing project in Asheville's River Arts District.

For the past few months, New Belgium had been preparing the site for its $175 million East Coast expansion brewery. In May, New Belgium management announced it was delaying the construction, due to adding increased capacity at its original brewery in Fort Collins, Colorado.

The Asheville brewery, which would eventually employ about 150 workers, has been pushed back by about eight months, a company spokesman said. As the schedule now stands, it would open in late 2015 or early 2016.

Hi-Wire Brewing has opened on Hilliard Avenue in what has become the city's South Slope brewing district, just around the corner from Asheville Brewing Co.

Owners Adam Charnack, Chris Frosaker and Matt Kiger have occupied the old Craggie Brewing site and made significant improvements. With a circus theme for its products, Hi-Wire has four year-round beers on draft and in 12-ounce bottles: Hi-Wire Lager, Bed of Nails Brown, Prime- Time Pale and Hi-Pitch IPA. It is also planning some seasonal selections.

Burial Beer has opened its doors on Collier Avenue, near the big Green Man Brewing operation at the bottom of the South Slope.

This little brewery is putting out a lot of beer from its one-barrel system, including Reaper Tripel, Hatchet North Carolina Lager, Pitchfork Saison made with New Zealand hops, Breakfast Stout and more.

Owners Jessica and Doug Reiser and their business partner Tim Gormley plan to eventually open a much bigger farmhouse brewery near Asheville. But they didn't want to wait, and chose to start small to introduce their beers to Asheville. Burial is currently open only on Fridays and Saturday.

Lookout Brewing has set up shop in Black Mountain, about 20 minutes from Asheville.

Owner John Garcia was a home brewer, and his ales were well-received by friends and family. So he took it another step, opening this half-barrel nano system.

This is a true family operation with his step-father Rich Jones doing much of the brewing and his wife Alison and mother Patricia Jones heavily involved in the operation. Lookout is making a lot of beer on its system from First Run golden ale to Dungadoon blond ale. The brewery on South Ridgeway Avenue, near downtown, is open Monday-Saturday.

Finally, Oysterhouse Brewing has moved from its small downtown location to its long planned expansion brewery on Haywood Road in West Asheville.

Owner Billy Klingel has built a fivebarrel system and is turning out plenty of the brewery's famous Moonstone Oyster Stout, and other beers. The new location also has a café serving small plates and plenty of oysters and indoor and outdoor seating. The place is open daily. Http://oysterhousebeers.Com/

Still to come in Asheville is a second brewing site for the Morganton-based Catawba Valley Brewing Co.

Owner Scott Piatt will open his expansion on Fairview Road, near French Broad Brewery. Catawba Valley will keep its main brewing location in Morganton and use the new seven-barrel Asheville system for specialty ales. The site will also a have a big tasting room. Piatt has his equipment in hand and hopes to have the place open later this year.

Read the full article at http://sbnonline.brewingnews.com/article/Greetings+From+Asheville+Big+And+Small/1477471/170855/article.html.

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