Southern Brew News April/May 2013 : Page 1

By Owen Ogletree MIGHTY OAK. Monday Night co-founders Jonathan Baker and Joel Iverson show off the brewery's barrel aging room PHOTO BY: OWEN OGLETREE small kickboxing trophy sits on the fi replace mantle of the brand new tasting room at Monday Night Brewing in Atlanta. It reads, "Kick Ass Brew-ery Award presented to Monday Night -Best Brewery in the Galaxy." Sure, the guys at the brewery gave the award to themselves, but that's okay -loads of fresh Monday Night follow-ers think the award fi ts. Monday Night owners Jonathan Baker, Joel Iverson and Jeff Heck met a few years ago in a Friday day morn-ing bible study. One of the guys just got a beer brewing kit and invited everyone over for a Monday night brew session in the garage. The get-together proved so popular, that the guys spent every Monday night making beer in that garage for the next fi ve years. Come Monday "We put together a three-year brew-ery business plan that turned into a fi ve-year plan," recalls Jonathan Baker, self-proclaimed "Marketing Guy & Master of Mind Control" Control for Monday Night. " "IPA was the fi rst batch b we completed -it took us fi ve years to get it just where we w wanted it. We started ou by contract brew-out ing with Thomas Creek and Lazy Magnolia, saw demand as much high than anticipated, higher and started looking for bre a brewery space of our own." own After exploring 12 different locations, the three busi-ness partners locked in their new At-lanta brewery site at 670 Trabert Avenue NW last June. "We wanted to be on the See Monday Night p. 3 Louisiana .......................................... 11 Georgia ............................................ 16 Alabama/Mississippi .......................... 18 Tennessee ......................................... 19 The Carolinas ................................... 20 Florida ............................................. 22 By Nora D. McGunnigle ILLUSTRATION BY: HANS GRANHEIM A lthough New Orleans is well known as a party town, the state of Louisiana has lagged behind other states in number of breweries. Currently, the state ranks 11th nationwide in beer consumption per capita, though it ranks 47th for number of breweries. But over the past few years, the success of new Louisiana breweries such as NOLA Brewing, Bayou Teche, and Tin Roof have inspired a new generation of brewers. Of the fi ve breweries (and one brewpub) in Louisiana that are on track to have breweries fully operational in 2013, Mandeville’s Chafunkta Brewing Company was the fi rst to be approved (Feb. 19) to distribute beer. “Compared to many other states, we are behind when it comes to the num-Chafunkta owner and ber of craft breweries in existence. We brewer Josh Erikson. wanted to be a part of changing that here, PHOTO BY NORA MCGUNNIGLE helping the Louisiana craft beer scene grow,” explains Chafunkta’s co-founder, Josh Erikson. As he and his wife Jaime raised their See Louisiana p. 4 INSIDE Calendar ............................................2 Dr. Brewski ........................................6 Tasting Notes ......................................7 Homebrew News ..................................8 The Style Section .................................9 Map & Directories ..........................12-15 State by State News

Louisiana's New Brewery BOOM

Nora D. McGunnigle

Chafunkta owner and brewer Josh Erikson.

Although New Orleans is well known as a party town, the state of Louisiana has lagged behind other states in number of breweries. Currently, the state ranks 11th nationwide in beer consumption per capita, though it ranks 47th for number of breweries.

But over the past few years, the success of new Louisiana breweries such as NOLA Brewing, Bayou Teche, and Tin Roof have inspired a new generation of brewers. Of the five breweries (and one brewpub) in Louisiana that are on track to have breweries fully operational in 2013, Mandeville’s Chafunkta Brewing Company was the first to be approved (Feb. 19) to distribute beer.

“Compared to many other states, we are behind when it comes to the number of craft breweries in existence. We wanted to be a part of changing that here, helping the Louisiana craft beer scene grow,” explains Chafunkta’s co-founder, Josh Erikson. As he and his wife Jaime raised their family, they both became more serious about brewing and creating recipes. “We both really enjoyed every aspect of homebrewing,” Josh says.

Since the federal permitting process requires a location to begin, the Eriksons secured their facility in 2011. In 2012, the Eriksons acquired their 1.5 barrel (bbl) nanobrewing system from fellow Louisiana brewer Andrew Godley of Parish Brewing.

Chafunkta’s flagship beers are an imperial IPA called Voo Ka Ray, a labor of love for self-professed “hophead” Josh, as well as the locally sourced Old 504 Coffee- Infused Vanilla Robust Porter, co-formulated by Jamie. Josh says, “with these two brews you're getting both Jamie and me in beer, as we both personally love these two brews and more importantly, we love sharing them with others.”

Cajun culture!

Leith Adams, head brewer and cofounder of Mudbug Brewing, feels that “there hasn't been a big enough movement by the local beer culture to embrace the Cajun culture, which is different from any other culture in the world.” With beers like King Cake Ale and Cajun Stout, an American stout with a hint of cayenne pepper, Mudbug Brewing is working to fill that void.

Since 2011, Mudbug has acquired a 7,000 square foot commercial space in Thibodaux, purchased a 4bbl Psycho Brew system, and begun the permitting process. If all goes smoothly, brewing will begin this summer. Leith hopes to begin a barrel aging program, a firkin program, and a “Cajun Royalty” imperial series. He also hopes that they will be upgrading to a larger system quickly after beginning production. “As of now, getting on the market and staying there is our immediate goal. Where the market and beer takes us from there is up in the air.”

Zac Caramonta of Gnarly Barley Brewing calls 2012 “a year of learning” and anticipates being fully funded and licensed to brew commercially this year. Zac and his wife Cari met their goal of investor funds in December, but realized that they could expand their system from a nano size to a microbrewery with additional funding opportunities.

“Over the last year things have snowballed,” Zac says. “This has pushed things back quite a bit but the tradeoff is worth it.” They have a 10,000 square foot space in Ponchatoula, have finalized the design of their brewhouse with the equipment manufacturer, and begun filing their paperwork.

Four flagship beers are planned: Catahoula Common, a common-style lager; Hoppopotomus, a cross between an American and an English IPA, Korova Milk Porter, a milk porter with notes of sweet chocolate, coffee and just a touch of roasted barley; and Radical Rye PA, an “Imperial Pale Ale” with the IBU levels of an IPA but balanced by strong British caramel malts. He also hopes to brew a rotation of specialty beers to keep things interesting.

Courtyard in Bywater

San Diego transplant Scott Wood and Louisiana native Lindsay Hellwig met, married, and began a craft beer partnership called the Courtyard Brewery. The brewery’s name comes from their first home together in New Orleans’ French Quarter, where they would take part in a communal brewing process with their neighbors in the building’s courtyard. Scott and Lindsay hope to recreate the family-friendly beer drinking culture they loved in San Diego, as well as make beers that stand up to the strong flavors of New Orleans cuisine

They have found a space in the Bywater neighborhood in New Orleans, and are awaiting delivery of a 2-bbl system from Cincinnati. They hope that once the brewhouse is in operation, they'll have 10-15 beers on tap, see what the market responds to, and adjust from there. Some of their beers include: a 4.4% ABV session-strength IPA called “Baby IPA”; “Double-Tripel,” a double IPA hop bill on a Belgian tripel yeast and malt profile; an IPA brewed with Nelson Sauvin hops; and a brown ale-IPA hybrid dubbed “Dirty IPA.”

In Arabi, Michael Naquin is renovating a warehouse that overlooks the levee. He’s been working towards opening 40 Arpent Brewing Company since 2011; because his original business plan expanded, the process has taken much longer than he originally anticipated. However, Naguin believes it will be worth the wait. He and his business partner, Carl Doescher, are working to bring the space up to code and install their 10-bbl system to have the brewhouse in working order by mid-March. Naquin says that the permitting process has been challenging, since it’s the first brewery in the area, but he’s had a lot of community support and hopes to be able to provide his neighbors with a place to enjoy music, beer, and each other once 40 Arpent is open for business.

Naquin is still working on his flagship beers, but his red ale made with local red beans and rice as well as several lagers have been served to potential investors and have gotten positive feedback. He plans to work with mixing and barrel aging, and plans to brew farmhouse/saison styles as well as Trappist-style ales.

Bubbling under the surface

Nick Powers, owner of the Mandeville craft beer bar The Barley Oak, believes that Louisiana craft beer’s expansion is just "bubbling under the surface," and he's positioned himself accordingly by bringing the Old Rail brewpub to Mandeville.

Named after the railroad depot previously on that spot, construction began in 2011 and finished in mid 2012. The brewpub has a brewmaster, an executive chef, and a 10-bbl, custom-made, steam-powered brewing system. However, since they are still waiting on final federal approval, they cannot brew and cannot open to the public. They'd originally hoped for the summer of 2012, but now they are hoping the process will allow them to start brewing and serving by spring.

Powers also invested in a water treatment/ filtration system which strips minerals, ions, and other molecules out of the water, and adds the mineral makeup for a particular style. He wants to be able to brew authentic German and British style beers; as beer is mostly water, it's important to be able to manipulate.

With these six businesses set to open this year, Louisiana’s craft beer enterprises will double in number. Although all of these breweries have diverse business plans and are scattered all over the state, they all take the commitment to increasing and improving Louisiana’s craft beer options very seriously.

“Compared to many other states, we are behind when it comes to the number of craft breweries in existence.”

“There has n’t been a big enough movement by the local beer culture to embrace the Cajun culture, which is different from any other culture in the world!”

Read the full article at http://sbnonline.brewingnews.com/article/Louisiana%27s+New+Brewery+BOOM/1376360/155246/article.html.

Monday Night Brewing

Owen Ogletree

Weekends are Overrated

MIGHTY OAK. Monday Night co-founders Jonathan Baker and Joel Iverson show off the brewery's barrel aging room

A Small kickboxing trophy sits on the fireplace mantle of the brand new tasting room at Monday Night Brewing in Atlanta. It reads, "Kick Ass Brewery Award presented to Monday Night - Best Brewery in the Galaxy." Sure, the guys at the brewery gave the award to themselves, but that's okay - loads of fresh Monday Night followers think the award fits.

Monday Night owners Jonathan Baker, Joel Iverson and Jeff Heck met a few years ago in a Friday morning bible study. One of the guys just got a beer brewing kit and invited everyone over for a Monday night brew session in the garage. The get-together proved so popular, that the guys spent every Monday night making beer in that garage for the next five years.

Come Monday

"We put together a three-year brewery business plan that turned into a fiveyear plan," recalls Jonathan Baker, selfproclaimed "Marketing Guy & Master of Mind Control" for Monday Night.

"IPA was the first batch we completed - it took us five years to get it just where we wanted it. We started out by contract brewing with Thomas Creek and Lazy Magnolia, saw demand as much higher than anticipated, and started looking for a brewery space of our own."

After exploring 12 different locations, the three business partners locked in their new Atlanta brewery site at 670 Trabert Avenue NW last June. "We wanted to be on the Westside of Atlanta - close to where we starting homebrewing," Jonathan explains. "We thought the building we chose was made to be a brewery the first time we saw it - great layout, perfect feel, high ceilings, plenty of water - everything we need.

Monday Night took delivery of brewing equipment in October, finished the brewery build-out the first week of January and commenced brewing immediately thereafter. Jonathan says, "We liked our contract brewers, but we LOVE having control now of every aspect of brewing - we give it lots of attention and love on our beer."

Learning the Ropes

Adam Bishop, Monday Night's "Head Brewery Guy & Yeast Whisperer," had to work three months for free on the bottling line at SweetWater in Atlanta before he was offered a paid position there. Adam then worked for free for almost a year with Kevin McNerney at 5 Seasons Brewing. "I learned the industry at Sweetwater," he says. "But I learned how to brew with Kevin at 5 Seasons. I picked up all my brewing skills right on the job."

Next, Adam considered a brewing position at Santa Fe Brewing in New Mexico, Harpoon in Boston or Duck Rabbit in North Carolina. He chose to move out west and pick up vital lab skills as Production Manager in Santa Fe. After the arrival of their first child, Adam and his wife decided to move back to Georgia to be closer to family and potential babysitters.

"I saw the Monday Night job opening and had to give it a shot," recalls Adam. "I consulted at first, got to know the guys, and everyone seemed pretty happy."

Jonathan adds, "Adam came on last September - right before our equipment came in - good timing. We are so happy with Adam. From his first batch, he has been spot-on. We budgeted to throw out a few batches to get things right but have not had to dump a single one. To pass Jeff's high standards so quickly, Adam has done extremely well."

Monday's Beers are Fair of Face

Monday Night Eye Patch Ale comes in as a malty, 6.2% ABV IPA spiced with Cascade, Columbus and Magnum hops. Caramel malts are backed by citrusy hop flavor and impressive bitterness.

Drafty Kilt Scotch Ale presents a slightly sweet, dark caramel backbone highlighted by a delicate touch of smoke and roasted malts. This 7.2% ABV ale contains 26 IBUs from Columbus and Willamette hops.

Fu Manbrew, a Belgian-style white beer, is made with German Hallertau hops and a touch of ginger. At 5.2% ABV and 15 IBUs, Fu Manbrew ranks as the most refreshing and sessionable beer in Monday Night's starting lineup.

Monday Night's brewhouse, made up of a brand new, four-vessel, 30 barrel DME system, has been customized extensively with Adam's help. With four 90 bbl and two 30 bbl fermenters, the spacious facility offers considerable room for future expansion.

Monday Night sells beer currently in Georgia from the north border down to Columbus. "We'd love to expand into the rest of Georgia by the end of the year, followed by certain cities in Tennessee and North Carolina," says Jonathan.

That Monday Night Feeling

A window in one corner of the tasting room offers a peek into Monday Night's barrel aging room housing oak vessels from Four Roses and Maker's Mark. A climate control system simulates changes in the seasons, allowing beers to mature fully in the barrels over shorter periods of time. Adam plans on barrel-aging the Scotch ale to start, followed by a double IPA he's planning for the future.

Designing Monday Night's eclectic tasting room décor fell on Jonathan, who wanted the facility to look like the garage where he first started brewing. No two chairs are the same, and the whopping room is highlighted by murals, wooden paneling from an old barn, a Space Invaders videogame, working fireplace, projection TV, sofas, barrel tables, corner gift shop, bar lights made from old chicken feeders, a wall of ties, and expansive outdoor patio with bocce ball. There's also a custom shuffleboard table complete with bottle openers and Monday Night emblem.

Monday Night's logo is a black silhouette of Joel - playing on the concept of guy in a business suit with a loose tie. "We were white collar guys," says Jonathan. "I wanted to come over to Joel's house to take some pictures of him to create our logo, and I suggested he wear a jacket and dark, loose tie. So, there was Joel - standing in his shirt, jacket, loose tie and boxer shorts. I had no choice - our logo had to be from the waste up."

Jonathan Baker sees Monday Night as the only brewery out there creating beer specifically for consumption on weeknights - cooking up beers to be savored with dinner - not guzzled. "It's our goal to brew beers that are both interesting and accessible," he explains. "After all, you've got to work the next day, right?"

“We put together a three year brewery business plan that turned into a five-year plan”

Read the full article at http://sbnonline.brewingnews.com/article/Monday+Night+Brewing/1376365/155246/article.html.

Next Page


Publication List
Using a screen reader? Click Here