Southern Brew News June/July 2012 : Page 1

EAGLE & LION Orlando Around THE World of Beer in Husband and wife Jason and Erin Austin getting busy in the Cupcake Brewery kitchen. PHOTO BY RICHARD MITCHELL Born from a Passion By Bill Plott hings have changed at Disney World. In the past, the only place you could get a beer was at one of the “countries” in Epcot. Today, you can still drink your way around the world in Epcot. But also you can find a variety of craft beers and imports T ILLUSTRATION BY: HANS GRANHEIM N BROE BROTHERS -Owners Tom and Mark Broe raise a toast B to rea real ale Griffin, GA GA. PHOTO BY OWEN OGLETREE al al l e at the Eagle & Lion in Griffin for Real Ale throughout the huge complex. And there’s a genuine brewpub on the Boardwalk. Our visit coincided with the Disney World Marathon, a major fundraiser for the Lymphoma and Leukemia Society. We have an eight-year-old grandson who just completed his chemo treatments after a See Orlando p. 3 INSIDE Calendar ........................... 2 Letter From Editor ............ 2 Tasting Notes ................... 6 Homebrew News .............. 9 Style ............................... 10 Maps & Directories .... 12-15 Dr. Brewski ..................... 11 State by State News Georgia ..................... 16 Alabama/Mississippi 18 Tennessee ................ 19 The Carolinas ........... 20 Florida ...................... 22 Louisiana .................. 23 early ten years ago, after a long day at his Lincolnshire U.K. chiro-practic office, American-born Mark Broe sat on a wooden bench in a person-able English pub and sipped a pint of one of the best cask-conditioned ales he had ever tasted. It was an almost transcendental experience, and Mark realized he needed a change. He wanted to create his own cask ale. English cask ale (or real ale) is often quite low in alcohol and contains living yeast cells that provide a soft carbonation in the unfiltered beer once it's sealed inside casks called firkins. A very delicate and vulnerable form of beer, real ale requires thoughtful brewing techniques, timely trans-portation to the pub and meticulous care by pub owners. "Living and working in the U.K. con-vinced me of the value of a fine English ale," says Mark. "But I found that you were likely to get a bad pint at times, so I wanted to improve the beer in the region where I lived." A Leap of Faith Mark left the chiropractic field and enrolled in Brewlab's Sunderland Brewing University. "This was truly a leap of faith for me," Mark notes. "There were not a lot of brewing jobs at the time, but I managed to get a job at Grand Union Brewery in See Eagle & Lion p. 4 PHOTO COURTESY OF EAGLE AND LION

Around The World Of Beer In Orlando

Bill Plott

Things have changed at Disney World. In the past, the only place you could get a beer was at one of the “countries” in Epcot.

Today, you can still drink your way around the world in Epcot. But also you can find a variety of craft beers and imports throughout the huge complex. And there’s a genuine brewpub on the Boardwalk.

Our visit coincided with the Disney World Marathon, a major fundraiser for the Lymphoma and Leukemia Society. We have an eight-year-old grandson who just completed his chemo treatments after a three-year battle with leukemia. Orlando was a celebration of his fight. We all stayed together in Jambo House in the Animal Kingdom Resort.

Once you get your mind-set off of this-is-just-a-manufactured-Africa, it can actually be fun. Our rooms looked out on savannahs populated by an assortment of African animals and birds. It was not unusual to wake up and watch giraffes, antelopes and zebras grazing below.

Here’s looking at you kid…

Three floors down was Victoria Falls, a bar African foods and beers. My wife, looked at the menu, andsaid “Where are the African beers?” The server replied that they were not pictured but were indeed available bottles of Tusker and Casa. They actually have a third African beer. That would be Miller Lite, which is now a South African Breweries product.

Tusker is from East African Breweries in Kenya while Casa Beer, billed as “The original beer from Morocco,” is brewed by Brasseries de Casablanca. With our best imitations of Humphrey Bogart, we had a “Here’s looking at you, kid” toast with one of each.

Our second experience was not quite as exotic. At Cap’n Jacks, a seafood restaurant in the Main Street Resort, we washed down passable crab cakes with Samuel Adams Winter Lager and Yuengling. The six bucks for the Yuengling was mildly annoying since the stuff was no doubt produced just 84 miles away at the company’s Tampa brewery.

In the Animal Kingdom theme park, we had lunch at Yak & Yetis, a restaurant featuring “Asian cuisine that combines flavors from China, India and Nepal.” As usual, there was a wait for seating, but you could also while away that wait at the bar. We did so, sipping pints of Safari Beer. The beer was exotic in name only. The bartender readily acknowledged that Safari Beer, a red ale, was actually Killian’s Red in clever $6.50 disguise.

Most of the major breweries have taken advantage of such renaming to sell partisan, “home team beers” at ballparks over the years. But at Epcot, the brews are what they are supposed to be. While our runners went back to their rooms to shower and change, we got an early start on international fare. Moosehead and Labatt’s were plentiful in Canada. There was more Casa waiting in Morocco, and Bass in England.

The European Grand Tour

On that tenuous border between the Italy and Germany pavilions, you could find some nice wines. At Via Napoli, where brick oven pizza was a specialty. Peroni was at the top of the beer list. Via Napoli also had two other exclusive Italian beers: Menabrea Birra and Menabrea 1846, a couple of pale lagers that worked very well with pizza.

When we crossed the “border” into” Germany there was an unexpected, indeed shocking problem. The kiosk selling Altenmunster Oktoberfest ran out of beer! The embarrassed server said they would have more beer in “five to seven minutes.” Sure enough, in a matter of minutes a young man came hurrying up, pushing a barrel. They were still out of the Oktoberfest but had plenty of a nice dark offering from Hovels of Dortmund.

Later, when the line was shorter, we did find a souvenir mug of the Altenmunster Oktoberfest to share as we started the long, long trek back to the parking lot. As we passed the Swiss pavilion, I was struck by the fact that the only draft beer appeared to be Bud Light. They did have Carlsberg in bottles, though.

A Boardwalk Brewpub

Our final Disney World beer experience was Sunday lunch at Big River Grille & Brewery on the Disney Boardwalk. Like the brewpubs in Chattanooga and Nashville, this Big River was a great place for lunch. All of the Big River breweries offer basically the same sampler flight with such familiar names as Southern Flyer Light Lager, Iron Horse Stout and Sweet Magnolia American Brown Ale.

“The light lager, the pilsner, pale ale, red and brown are all pretty much staples from the original Gordon Biersch concept recipes,” said brewer Kent Waugh, adding that some obvious adjustments are made for local conditions such as water quality.

That being said, what’s it like brewing at Disney World? Boring?

Not on your life, says Waugh. “This is a dream job for me,” he said.

He has small children so there are great perks for being a “cast member” at Disney World.

But there is also room for a brewer to experiment and try some different things because the flight always includes one or two seasonal beers.

“We get to do a Brewer’s Select three or four times a year. I did a Soleil IPA, which is named after my daughter. It just won a Bronze at the Florida Better Beer Competition,” said Waugh. “And our Rocket Red Ale won a Bronze last year at the Great American Beer Festival.”

He also gets to do some modest cask experiments. Most recently, he added three ounces of sweet orange peel and Cascade leaf hops to Steamboat Pale Ale.

“This is a 10-barrel system. I can’t do big batches, but the cask beer is another creative outlet that I have here,” he said.

Waugh, who started out as a homebrewer, has been at Disney World about two years. He entered the business at Boulder Beer Co. In Colorado.

“I was out of brewing and in construction for a few years. It’s been great to get back into brewing. One of my favorite parts of being here is the eclectic group of people I meet. It changes every day,” he said.

One of the changes is the increasing number of people who come to Big River because it’s not just another nice restaurant but also is a brewpub, an outlet for “the craft beer crowd.”

Read the full article at http://sbnonline.brewingnews.com/article/Around+The+World+Of+Beer+In+Orlando/1087728/115133/article.html.

Eagle & Lion

Born from a Passion for Real Ale

BROE BROTHERS - Owners Tom and Mark Broe raise a toast to real ale at the Eagle & Lion in Griffin, GA. PHOTO BY OWEN OGLETREE

Nearly ten years ago, after a long day at his Lincolnshire U.K. chiropractic office, Americanborn Mark Broe sat on a wooden bench in a personable English pub and sipped a pint of one of the best cask-conditioned ales he had ever tasted. It was an almost transcendental experience, and Mark realized he needed a change. He wanted to create his own cask ale.

English cask ale (or real ale) is often quite low in alcohol and contains living yeast cells that provide a soft carbonation in the unfiltered beer once it's sealed inside casks called firkins. A very delicate and vulnerable form of beer, real ale requires thoughtful brewing techniques, timely transportation to the pub and meticulous care by pub owners.

"Living and working in the U.K. convinced me of the value of a fine English ale," says Mark. "But I found that you were likely to get a bad pint at times, so I wanted to improve the beer in the region where I lived."

A Leap of Faith

Mark left the chiropractic field and enrolled in Brewlab's Sunderland Brewing University. "This was truly a leap of faith for me," Mark notes. "There were not a lot of brewing jobs at the time, but I managed to get a job at Grand Union Brewery in London, became the head brewer after only nine months and worked there for almost four years. I think that the secret to great cask beer lies in solid British brewing techniques, and my beers at Grand Union won local, regional and national awards."

Mark decided to move to Georgia in 2007 to look after his aging mother who now lives in the small, historic town of Griffin just one hour south of Atlanta. In 2008 he took a job at Atlanta's Red Brick Brewing, where he tried very hard to boost the brewery's interest in cask ales but soon realized that Red Brick's focus needed to remain on growing their brands and keeping up with production.

Surprised at the growing popularity of extreme beers in the U. S.A., Mark recalls, "I came back from England and didn't drink beer above 6. 5% alcohol. I think if you drink a lot of strong ales, you can ruin your health. Extreme brewing techniques of over-hopping can also be unpleasant and overwhelming to me. So I decided to try and bring English-style brews to Georgia."

A Cask to Call Your Own

In September of 2010, Mark left Red Brick with the goal of opening his own brewpub to satisfy his craving for Englishstyle cask ales. With the help of his mother and brother Tom, Mark set out to purchase an eight barrel Porter brew system much like the one he used at Grand Union. Porter would not sell and ship a new system to America, but, as luck would have it, Mark spotted a used Porter brewhouse from a defunct brewery in Birmingham, England listed on a website. Mark purchased the equipment (that came with 150 firkins) in April of 2011 - all with no idea of how and where he would establish his brewpub.

As possible locations in Atlanta and Decatur fell through, a resident of Mark's mother's retirement community in Griffin mentioned that the town had recently modified its laws to allow for brewpubs and was looking for someone to open one. As Mark walked through downtown Griffin one day last summer, he spotted a rental sign in the front window of an attractive restaurant that had sat empty for many months. The door was open, Mark walked in for a look, and signed the lease last September.

Birth of a Brewpub

Then followed a six month installation of bar, kitchen and brewing equipment prior to the opening of Eagle & Lion at 414 East Taylor Street. A front patio with picnic tables now leads to a central bar area complete with English handpump beer engines for serving Mark's real ales. A fine selection of bottled and draft craft beers rounds out one of the best beer menus in the area.

When asked about selling Englishstyle cask ales to the locals in Griffin, Mark replies, "It takes some educating on our part, but so far the locals have been very accepting. We sell more of my beers than the other beers we offer, but just like in the U. K., you still have a lot of people drinking light lagers."

Eagle & Lion's cask ales are served in 10 ounce half pints and 20 ounce imperial pints. Mark and his brother Tom still argue about whether or not to serve small flights of his beers. "I don't want to do a beer flight," Mark claims. "I have the strong opinion that a sip doesn't give you an accurate interpretation of what a beer is all about - you should have at least a half pint."

British Brewing Techniques

The brewhouse at Eagle & Lion sits behind glass at the rear of the brewpub and ranks as the only Porter system in America. After a basic infusion mash, Mark drains wort to the boiling copper for a one hour minimum boil with only whole cone hops from the Pacific Northwest and England. With Eagle & Lion's system, trub and hops settle to the bottle of the kettle, and the beer comes off the top into one of two open fermenters equipped with water cooling systems.

10. 8 gallon firkins are filled directly from the fermenters, then conditioned at 55 degrees F for a few days in upright position. The upright firkin is then moved carefully to the cooler under the bar and fitted with a cask "widge" float that pulls beer from the top, insuring that the yeast sediment remains at the bottom of the cask.

Outstanding U.K. Maris Otter malt forms the backbone of all the house beers at Eagle & Lion. Look for the popular 4.1% Brass Monkey Mild with sweet hints of chocolate malt, 3.7% Tipsy Toad flavorful session bitter, 4.2% Golden Eagle with rich hop flavor, malty 4.5% South of Taylor Special Bitter, 4.5% single-varietal hopped Yes Face IPA (made with a different hop in each brew) and the 4.8% East Griffin Stout with delightful notes of roasted barley.

Eagle & Lion's food items seem worthy of a great ale - with crab cakes, cheddar & ale soup, fresh Alaskan cod fish & chips, and daily chalkboard specials highlighting the compact, yet appetizing menu.

What constituted the most rewarding aspect of opening Eagle & Lion for Mark? "Drinking real ale here in Griffin," he says. "It worked out exactly as I planned."

Read the full article at http://sbnonline.brewingnews.com/article/Eagle+%26amp%3B+Lion/1087732/115133/article.html.

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